Menu

Education Today Logo


newsletter

Education Today Cover Browse Issue

Using mobiles at night bad for teens

Research conducted by Murdoch and Griffith Universities tracked changes in late-night mobile phone use, sleep, and mental health indicators over three years in a large sample of Australian teens.

The researchers found that adolescents’ late-night mobile phone use was directly linked to poor quality sleep, which subsequently led to poorer mental health outcomes, reduced coping, and lowered self-esteem.

“We have demonstrated how poor sleep is the key link connecting an increase in night-time mobile use with subsequent increases in psychosocial issues,” said Lead researcher, Dr Lynette Vernon.

“Heavy mobile phone use becomes a problem when it overtakes essential aspects of adolescent life. In this case, we see issues when it overtakes time set-aside for sleep.

“We found that late night phone use directly contributed to poor sleep habits, which over time led to declines in overall wellbeing and mental health.”

The research was part of the Youth Activity Participation Study, funded by the Australian Research Council. The study surveyed 1100 students from 29 schools annually over four years in total, starting in Year 8 and following them until Year 11.

Students were asked what time of the night they received or sent text messages and phone calls, and their perceptions of their sleep quality.

The researchers also investigated adolescents’ symptoms of depressed mood, involvement in delinquency or aggression, and their coping and self esteem over time.

Results showed that in Year 8, more than 85 per cent of students owned a mobile phone and around one-third of these students reported they never texted or received phone calls after lights out.

But three years later 93 per cent of the students owned mobiles and 22 per cent of the Year 11 students reported no late night mobile use.

“We found that those teenagers who start out as relatively ‘healthy’ in terms of their late-night mobile use early in high school, tend to show steeper escalations in their late-night mobile use over the next several years,” said study co-author Dr Kathryn Modecki from the Griffith Menzies Health Institute.

“This means that even when teens appear to have their technology and sleep under control early-on, they still require monitoring and education as they mature.”

“Students with high initial levels of night-time mobile phone use also tended to have higher initial levels of poor sleep behaviour,” Vernon said. “As their levels of mobile phone use grew over time, so did their poor sleep behaviour.”

“These increases in poor sleep, in turn, led to rises in depressed mood and externalizing behaviours, and declines in self-esteem and coping one year later,” said Modecki. “These effects were highly robust, across the various outcomes Dr Vernon examined.”

Although these results were concerning, the answer is not as simple as just banning adolescent phone use.

“There are many potential benefits of mobile technology, but these results demonstrate the importance of adults ‘meeting teens where they are’, enforcing electronic curfews, and teaching good sleep habits during the high school years.”

The study was published in a special section of Child Development.


13 Jun 2019 | International
16 year old UWA music prodigy best in the world News Image

Ready for a what am I doing with my life moment? Here you go; 16-year-old Shuan Hern Lee a student from The University of Western Australia has been named the best junior pianist in the world. Read More

13 Jun 2019 | Sydney
Vivid Sydney shared with students from regional Australia News Image

Students from Mount Burr in South Australia will get the opportunity to visit the emerald city and see the world-famous Vivid festival, evening up the disparity in experiences between city and regional students. Read More

13 Jun 2019 | National
Education hack attacks up and looking for money News Image

Education look out; there was a noticeable shift towards financially motivated cyber crime (80%) in educational services.
Read More

13 Jun 2019 | National
Jobs for teachers see most growth News Image

Jobs are down a bit from last year according to SEEK but the good news is that wages are up and it’s still great to be a teacher or in education.
Read More

13 Jun 2019
NESLI’s global experts to tackle education leadership in low GDP areas News Image

The National Excellence in Schools Leadership Institute (NESLI) have announced the ten global experts who will make up NESLI’s inaugural advisory board.
Read More