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Seven crafty primary schools in a sticky $21,000 situation

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Seven crafty primary schools have won their share in $21,000 worth of cash and prizes after entering the Bostik Smart Schools program.

In collaboration with Winc and OfficeMax, the Bostik Smart Schools program encouraged primary school students across Australia to get creative and enter a unique craft project for a chance to win one of three first prizes of $5,000 for their school thanks to Bostik.

Launched on 22 April and closed on 14 July, three winners were chosen based on selection criteria in each age group category: 5–8 years, 9–10 years and 13 years, each receiving $5,000. The Runners Up of each category also received a $1000 product pack and the People’s Choice Award collected $3000.

This year’s environmental theme was selected to support education around sustainability and recycling while aligning with key school curriculums.

Bostik’s Category Manager, Mellissa Coulter, says that introducing grants like this is a great way to help schools raise much needed funds while allowing children to participate and lead in the process.

“The aim of the Smart Schools program is to support learning outcomes within school curriculums and help stimulate creative thinking and problem solving in the classroom,” she says.

“By asking our future leaders to create these projects, it encourages discussion around the importance of caring for the environment.

“Creative projects around the environment, climate change and sustainability, allows kids to understand how our eco-system works and helps them become more conscious of their everyday actions. This competition is just one of the ways we hope to give back to our school community.”

For more information on Smart Schools visit bostik.com/australia/smartschools or for craft inspirations visit bostik.com/ideasthatstick/

Smart Schools winners

Age 5-8 Category
Winner: Pascoe Vale North Primary School, VIC. Project: Time Machine. Runner Up: Bellerive Primary School, TAS. Project: Recyc-hill.

Age 9-10 Category
Winner: Belmore South Public School, NSW. Project: Strive to survive. Runner up: St. Bernard's Primary School, VIC. Project: Clag Bottles In Bloom.

Special mention: Dandenong North Primary School, VIC. Project: Eco-Mansion.

Age 11-13 Category
Winner: Leschenault Catholic Primary School, WA. Project: Precious Oceans.

Runner Up: Drouin Primary School, VIC. Project: The machines take over.

People’s Choice Category
Winner: School of the Good Shepherd PS, VIC. Project: Collaborative Collage.


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