Menu

Education Today Logo


newsletter

Education Today Cover Browse Issue

High schoolers take on futuristic space design challenge

News Image

Ten high schools from Australia and New Zealand are one step closer to representing the Australasian region at the International Space Settlement Competition at Kennedy Space Centre as Space Design Competitions Australia announces finalists for the 2017 Australian Space Design Competition.

To qualify, students from Years 9 to 12 used their science, engineering, technology and mathematics (STEM) skills to form fictional aeronautical firms and respond to a commercial Request for Tender. Their submission had to factor in all the challenges of a managing a remote space colony including zero-gravity design, waste management, nutrition provisions and tourism activities – to name a few.

Competition finalists

  • Calvary Christian College, Springwood (Queensland), Australia
  • Cannon Hill Anglican College, Brisbane (Queensland), Australia
  • Canterbury College, Waterford (Queensland), Australia
  • Corinda State High School, Brisbane (Queensland, Australia
  • The Hutchins School, Hobart (Tasmania), Australia
  • Padua College, Brisbane (Queensland), Australia
  • Rangitoto College, Mairangi Bay (Auckland) New Zealand
  • Sheldon College, Sheldon (Queensland), Australia
  • St Aidan’s Anglican Girl’s School, Brisbane (Queensland), Australia
  • St Laurence’s College, Brisbane (Queensland), Australia

Space Design Competitions Australia President David Shaw said while the challenge is fictional, the skills learned by students have significant practical application.

 “Space Design Competitions is proud to play even a small part in giving these students the skills they need as they move into university and the professional sector,” said Shaw.

“The high-tempo environment of the Australian Space Design Competition provides an opportunity for students to develop real-world STEM skills while encouraging innovation and business acumen.”

The Australian Space Design Competition Finals will be held from 13-14 January 2018 at the University of Queensland St Lucia Campus, Brisbane.

The winning team will travel to the United States to represent the Australasian region in the International Space Settlement Competition at Kennedy Space Centre, Florida in mid-2018.

Special Participant late entries open
There is still time to enter your school as a Special Participant wild card entry in the Australian Space Design Competition Finals. Contact David Shaw, President Space Design Competitions Australia, to register your interest: david@ausspacedesign.org.au

Visit www.ausspacedesign.org.au for competition information or watch this video from the National Finals held in early 2017.


17 Jan 2018 | Melbourne
New education initiatives to strengthen ties with India News Image

India, it’s a fascinating place, increasingly a major trading partner and they like cricket, so encouraging links with the country is a no brainer. A new exchange program will see Victorian kids travel to the country. Read More

17 Jan 2018
VU unique teaching model nears its debut News Image

The first year of university can be overwhelming but Victoria University, taking inspiration from the US and Sweden is easing the way with a more focused, intimate way of teaching. Read More

17 Jan 2018 | Melbourne
Reducing cyberbullying – parents to get involved News Image

Cyberbullying has been around as long as the internet and with social media’s prevalence it has been all the more acute. Its most insidious aspect is that once kids could get some respite once they left school now they can't. Read More

16 Jan 2018 | Melbourne
Tech Schools to deliver programs with CSIRO News Image

Australia’s CSIRO is absolutely world class and students who will be attending Victoria’s 10 tech schools will have access to scientists and science generated at the organization under an innovative new program. Read More

16 Jan 2018 | Melbourne
Independent schooling out of reach? Possibly not News Image

Just under half a million dollars to educate a child in the independent system in Australia. It’s a very scary number but while you could spend that amount accessing a private education you actually don’t have to. Read More