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ACER presents 'Little J and Big Cuz'

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Image above – Character Little J from the new series developed by Indigenous Education experts

New television series 'Little J & Big Cuz' is screening in homes and classrooms to support successful transitions to school for young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

Featuring the voice talent of Miranda Tapsell (Little J), Deborah Mailman (Big Cuz) and Aaron Fa’aso (Old Dog), the series builds a bridge between home and school. Each episode is a narrative adventure designed to implicitly build children’s understandings of their backyard, the school yard and Country.

“Currently Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in Australia are twice as likely to be identified as developmentally vulnerable, but they are only half as likely to access important early years education. We know for a fact that a focus on change in the early years is fundamental to Closing the Gap, and we welcome the emphasis 'Little J & Big Cuz' places on this critical time and the positive light it shines on our kids,” said Gerry Moore, Chief Executive of SNAICC – National Voice for our Children.

The Australian Council for Educational Research initiated the series in response to studies showing that educational television programs can help improve children’s transition to school.

ACER convened a team of Indigenous Education experts to develop a suite of 'Little J & Big Cuz' educational resources mapped to the Early Years Learning Framework and the Australian Curriculum.

“The educational resources model a way for early years educators to bring Indigenous perspectives into the classroom as part of daily conversations – thereby creating classroom environments in which Indigenous children feel valued and have a sense of belonging,” said Deirdre Jackson, Director of the ACER Foundation.

'Little J & Big Cuz' is a joint project of the Australian Council for Educational Research, Ned Lander Media, NITV, Screen Australia, Film Victoria, Screen Tasmania, the Australian Children’s Television Foundation and SNAICC – National Voice for our Children.

'Little J & Big Cuz' will air on NITV at 7:30pm AEST on Fridays from 28 April, and at 4pm AEST weekdays from 1 May. Source


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