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A shoulder to cry on, on your device

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We all need someone to talk to sometimes and failing the availability of a friend or family member What's right – Thrive is always there for you.

The chatbot offers a dialogue which is focussed on positive re-enforcement, at regular intervals it will inform the user that they’re awesome, and is based on interdisciplinary research in positive psychology, neuroscience, elite sport and business leadership.

It’s also cheap, eliminating the barriers that the disadvantaged might encounter in seeking coaching or therapy.

For this What's right – Thrive's inventor Rory Darkins was announced as a finalist in the 2018 Optus Future Makers program which provides entrepreneurs with access to some of Australia’s best technology minds and a share of up to $300,000 in funding.

This year’s shortlist is working on programs supporting employability, education, health, disability support, inclusion and diversity, domestic violence and empowering women and girls.

The Optus Future Makers program supports social entrepreneurs to develop innovative tech solutions that help solve social issues for disadvantaged and vulnerable people so they can have a better future.

In addition to a share of $300,000 in available grant funding, finalists will participate in a four-month Accelerator program to hone their skills through workshops and mentoring that focus on technology, customer experience, marketing strategies, project planning, financial modelling and, importantly, how to create a sustainable and successful social enterprise.

Each finalist will be individually coached and mentored by some of the brightest talent at Optus and learn from some of the best technology experts and leaders in the industry. 

John Paitaridis, Managing Director, Optus Business, said, “It’s exciting to see this year’s finalists leverage technology advancements to help those who are most needy in our communities."

The finalists will have the opportunity to pitch for funding to a panel of expert judges in October. The judging panel will be made up of some of Australia’s most prominent names across technology, innovation, and social change.

To find out more about the Optus Future Makers program visit the website here.

Future Makers finalists

Rory Darkins, (NSW) – ‘What’s Right – Thrive’ is a life coach-in-your pocket. The app empowers users to become the best version of themselves and helps removes barriers that prevent disadvantaged people from accessing the support they need to thrive. What’s Right’s AI technology aims to remove this affordability barrier by delivering world-class coaching through a fully automated yet personalised ‘virtual coach’.

Chris Boyle, (QLD) – ‘Commsync’ harnesses the power of technology to eliminate domestic violence connecting vulnerable community members to their safety network, through the push of a button.

Dr Stefan Schutt, (Vic) – ‘vPlay’ is an online program that helps people with Autism who have trouble mastering social interaction and have difficulty finding jobs. vPlay provides people with Autism the necessary tools to practise both ‘people’ and ‘technical’ skills through simulated role plays with virtual characters, that can be accessed and edited via any web browser.

Chris Smeed, (QLD) – ‘ImmCalc’ is an application that automates complex immunisation schedules for refugees, migrants and others needing catch-up vaccines, making it easier to ensure that vulnerable patients are protected against preventable diseases.

Michael Tozer, (NSW) – ‘Xceptional’ is a technology services firm which recognises the unique strengths of people with Autism such as pattern recognition, sustained concentration and precision that are closely aligned with IT roles.

Rick Martin, (NSW) – ‘Equal Reality’ allows users to “walk a mile in someone else’s shoes to understand what it’s like to be discriminated or harassed” through virtual reality. Equal Reality provides computer generated, interactive scenarios to help people understand and help deliver diversity and inclusion training.

Michael Metcalfe (QLD) – ‘Kynd’ is a mobile app based solution that matches disadvantaged locals with professional needs based support. As individuals have specific requirements or preferences when being cared for, Kynd helps users find a perfect professional match based on personality, location, budget, interests, skills, training and experience.


2 Dec 2019
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2 Dec 2019 | SA
Be Active Challenge increases activity News Image

A total of $50,000 has been awarded to 50 schools recognised for their outstanding achievement in this year’s South Australian Premier’s be active Challenge.
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2 Dec 2019 | National
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1 Dec 2019 | National
Provide free school travel for struggling students News Image

Public transport isn’t cheap anymore, even with a concession it is $607 for a full-year student pass. Some families cannot afford a myki, let alone a lump-sum payment, which is currently the cheapest option. Read More

1 Dec 2019 | NSW
Second stop work for Catholic schools staff News Image

Employees at the Catholic Diocese of Maitland-Newcastle Catholic Schools Office (CSO) will engage in a second round of protected industrial action following further restructure announcements by the diocese this week. Read More