School Management

Go deep
Go deep
Deep Work: Sunk on the treacherous shoals of time control in tough schools Cal Newport’s concept of Deep Work was a best seller, and it developed a big following in the business world. As a result, the authors of this action research project focused on whether this concept would fit our schools, and if the perceptions and actions that school leaders, including teacher leaders developed while engaging in activities would promote deep learning, and consequentially influence their leadership effectiveness.   The findings indicated that while the concept itself is noble, and certainly worthy of emulating within a school’s context. In tough school communities however, participants reported that their ability to engage in Deep Work was very much influenced by the dynamics of the school day, and, not surprisingly, the place and time at which the Deep Work activities were undertaken. All participants believed that developing a culture that promoted Deep Work should be the top priority of every leadership group in their efforts to improve a school’s teaching and learning community. However, the day-to-day survival mode activities that all school leaders experienced prevented a full implementation of Newport’s Deep Work model. The impact of these findings should be further explored because they shine a light on the traditional structures and cultures of Australian schools.
Ray Boyd, FACEL, Principal and Dr Neil MacNeill, Principal
Sick
Sick
A spotlight on sick schools A classroom with poor lighting or inadequate heating rarely goes unnoticed. But until recently, good air quality wasn’t on the radar of most Australian educators.
Dr Vyt Garnys and Prof Tony Arnel
Electives
Electives
Clever algorithms take the guesswork out of timetabling By utilising student preferences and building elective lines around them, Hunter Sport High School satisfied more students and better utilised resources.
Perspective
Perspective
Embrace every opportunity: what remote learning has taught us all For those who embrace change, it has been exciting and provided new opportunities.
Sue Karzis, CEO of State Schools Relief
Bias
Bias
Redressing Survivorship Bias: Giving voice to the voiceless In education, and every other profession, we are complicit in Survivorship Bias each time we positively accepted many of the predetermined judgements made by those who have experienced idiosyncratic pathways to success.
Dr Neil MacNeill, and Ray Boyd (Principals)
Doubling
Doubling
Online school doubles subscriptions An online schooling platform for Australian and international students from pre-kindergarten to Year 12 has seen a doubling in the number of students subscribing to its website.
Changes
Changes
Changing the grammar of schooling post-COVID-19 Tyack and Cuban (1995) note that the ‘grammar’ for schools has changed barely a jot since Charles Dickens’ depiction of the M'Choakumchild School in Hard Times.
Univ-Prof D Klaus Zierer, Ordinarius fur Schulpadagogik, Universitat Augsburg and John Young, Principal, Clarkson Community High
Online health
Online health
How schools can leverage online health during COVID-19 Online speech pathology and occupational therapy services are suited to the current situation around the virus, therapy works well online with an appropriate support network
Ed Johnson, Chief Clinical Officer and Co-Founder of Umbo
No afro
No afro
Are school dress codes racist? James Emmanuel was born and raised in Orange NSW to immigrant African and Sri Lankan parents so he was always going to stand out. That difference was never more stark than when it came to complying with his independent school’s uniform requirements.
Collective
Collective
Link between school staff cohesion and student outcomes It seems that teachers still don’t truly understand the benefits of working together to build the capacity of students.
Rochelle Borton, EduInfluencers
Divide
Divide
Technology is vital to keep disadvantaged children learning throughout the pandemic As a result of the rapid transition to remote learning the very real digital divide between families was exposed.
Sue Karzis, CEO of State Schools Relief, Board Director, Educator and Advocate for Underprivileged School Children
Words matter
Words matter
Tiny acts of stunning grace It’s amazing that I, of all people, ended up teaching about happiness, positive workplace culture, and how to have great relationships with everyone you know. Amazing indeed, when you discover just how bad I used to be at all of those things.  
Toni Powell
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