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NSW Year 11 students completing NESA critical thinking test

The 2017 trial of the NESA online Critical Thinking test started with around 1000 students sitting the test on the first day. The test assesses skills in Logical Reasoning, Qualitative Analytical Reasoning and Quantitative Analytical Reasoning. 

Students will receive a report on their critical thinking skills.

NESA ran an initial trial in 2016, with 2500 students participating. The initial trial demonstrated that the test is valid and reliable. It is expected that more than 7000 students will sit this year’s test before the trial concludes on Friday 11 August.

NESA will be seeking feedback from participating students and teachers to inform future research into online assessment.


22 Aug 2019
Third of young people experience drug and alcohol problems News Image

A new Mission Australia report reveals that three in 10 young people say that alcohol and/or drugs are a problem for their family and peers.
Read More

20 Aug 2019 | National
Live streaming video platform for teen mental health News Image

Teenagers can be uncommunicative and yourtown’s Kids Helpline is changing the way they speak with teens who may be experiencing mental health concerns by tapping into an innovative campaign. Read More

20 Aug 2019 | National
Teach in the US News Image

Love it or hate it, you can’t ignore the US and time spent working in the country is the kind of experience that colours a life. The cultural exchange organisation Participate Learning is making the process easier. Read More

19 Aug 2019 | National
AI for Good Challenge winners announced  News Image

The inaugural winners of the AI for Good Challenge have been announced, the challenge is a new national competition for high school students to tackle real world social and environmental challenges using Artificial Intelligence. Read More

19 Aug 2019
Oz be warned - Independent public schooling is failing in England News Image

They were supposed to be a paradigm of excellence but state-funded independent schools in the UK, known as academies, widen inequality and ‘degrade’ the teaching workforce. Read More